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Graduate Profile of Nicholas Dougherty, M.S., Dipl.Ac. (NCCAOM), L.Ac.

  1. Date of graduation:2009
  2. Full-time or part-time practice: Three-quarter time split between two different practices.
  3. Current practice setting: I started my own practice in south Minneapolis in 2013 called Tranquil Waters Acupuncture & Wellness. It is a general practice with some specialty in neurology and internal medicine. My second practice is a solo practice with another Acupuncturist within an integrative clinic space with two Chiropractors and one Massage Therapist.
  4. Areas of practice specialization:
    • Type of patients: Suburban clinic setting specializing in reproductive health and fertility.
    • Type of therapy used:Traditional Chinese Medicine including Acupuncture, and TCM herbs consisting of raw herbal pharmacy as well as patent formulas.
    • Principal conditions treated: We specialize in reproductive health and fertility, mainly catering towards women. However, we also incorporate general medical practice and internal medicine.
  5. Postgraduate Education: Currently enrolled in a DAOM program at the American Academy of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine in Roseville, MN.
  6. Most rewarding aspect of practice: The most rewarding aspect of practice for me so far would have to one that I did not anticipate when starting out. The privilege of working with families towards their reproductive goals has been extremely rewarding and a fulfilling part of my career. This has been an unintended and priceless benefit of the work we do with fertility
  7. Most essential tips for other graduates desiring to establish a successful practice: Be involved. Be involved in both the community that you work in and the field. Now more than ever, we need to come together as a community of acupuncturists to move our industry forward in the direction towards a more integrated health care mode. Along with this, working in our local areas to help those in need is extremely important. If you have the ability to make change, however small, then you have the responsibility to do so.

    Be compassionate and approach each interaction, be it with a patient or fellow acupuncturist, with empathy. None of us has all the answers. We all look for help and guidance as we make our way. Each one of us and each situation requires understanding and patience.

    Never stop learning. One of the hallmarks of any professional field is that of continuing education. There is a great need to always learn and incorporate new techniques, principles of health and wellness, business practices, etc. As doctors and healers we should be continually learning. While in school we learn from our talented professors and classmates. Upon graduating and moving into practice, our teachers become and should continually remain our patients. There is not a day that goes by in which I do not glean some new insight or take away something I can do to better help my patients. This occurs whether through a seemingly simple intake question from a patient interaction, or by constantly questioning and evolving my approach/technique. We are truly students for life.

Nicholas Dougherty is a 2009 graduate of the American Academy of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, a CCAOM member institution. For a list of all CCAOM member colleges see state list.